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The Prince of Wales's Hospital Fund for London

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Daniel View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Daniel Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: The Prince of Wales's Hospital Fund for London
    Posted: 24 May 2020 at 16:53
1897 was Queen Victoria's DiamondJubilee and it was decided to issue a pair of charity stamps to benefit London's voluntary hospitals. They were the 1/- blue and 2/6 red  (sometimes referred to as orange) or red-brown. Here is the announcement in The Hospital, a newspaper or magazine, dated 15th May 1897

Scan_20200525 by Spicer57, on Flickr
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Daniel Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 May 2020 at 17:06
Here are the stamps displayed on a special-sheet, which has been cut to size to display on this album-page. Also shown below is the original envelope in which they came.


This is the reverse of the sheet:





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Post Options Post Options   Quote Daniel Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 May 2020 at 17:12
There were many associated souvenirs sold including match vesta case and varous photo frames for the stamps. Here is one such example produced by Walter-Jones of Sloane-Street:

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Post Options Post Options   Quote Daniel Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 May 2020 at 17:30
The issue was very successful and a set of 4 different stamps was issued for 1898, 1s. re, 2/6 light blue, 5/- dark blue and 10/- dark green. They were not as successful and so are more rare. The original 2 stamps are very common. There was a subscription booklet issued for ongoing stamp issues and the 1898 issued can be found with overprinted dates for 1899 onward but note that The Prince of Wales became king in 1901 and in 1902, the fund changed its name to The King Edward's Hospital Fund and in 1907 to just The King's Fund which continues to exist today. Note that the possessive case of Wales as Wales's is correct as Wales, the country, is singular rather than plural.

Here are the 1898 stamps:

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Post Options Post Options   Quote Daniel Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 May 2020 at 17:35
Here are examples of Benham's famous 'silk' cards depicting the 1898 stamps.

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Post Options Post Options   Quote Daniel Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 May 2020 at 17:48
Examples of the first pair of 1897 stamps are known used as postage-stamps on covers. This is an, almost, 'too good to be true' example sent from the Bahamas. It is addressed to Sir Henry Burdett who was a philanthropist knighted in the 1897 Diamond-Jubilee honours and who did work in the hospital-sector. It is he who is given credit for the stamps in the original article in 'The Hospital' at the beginning of this topic!

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Post Options Post Options   Quote Daniel Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 August 2021 at 17:38
In 1922, the King's Fund (still using the name King Edward's Hospital Fund) organised major fund raising for London Hospitals including issuing Cinderella stamps, costing 1d each, for 25 different London hospitals. These could be collected on cards issued by the King's Fund or for schools as the London Schools Hospital Fund. The cards would only have spaces for 12 stamps. 3 million stamps were sold.

The King's Fund card is taken from their blog. The Schools card is a recent purchase, it is terrible condition but only cost a few pounds compared to the £80+ for which they can sell, if you can find one.




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Post Options Post Options   Quote Colin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 August 2021 at 02:02
The Schools Card looks exactly as it should be, you can't create that kind of patina. I love the smudgy ink, perfect.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Steve Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 August 2021 at 07:59
Fantastic
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Daniel Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 August 2021 at 10:14
I did some more research for what appears to be Cormont Road School. There are three schools listed at that address and they turn out to be the same school in London SE5 (Kennington/Lambeth). From Wikipedia: 'The school was first established as St Gabriel's College in 1900. During the First World War, the building was requisitioned by the War Office to create the 1st London General Hospital, a facility for the Royal Army Medical Corps to treat medical casualties. After the war it became the Kennington Boys School and later became Charles Edward Brooke Girls' School, named after the "well-known Anglo-Catholic figure" and Vicar of St John the Divine, Kennington. .After the school closed in 2012, part of the site was converted for residential use as St Gabriel's Manor.'

How poignant that at one time it was itself a hospital.
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