Cinderella Stamps Forum Homepage
Forum Home Forum Home > Cinderella Stamps > Cinderella Stamps
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - CLASSIC CINDERELLA MYSTERIES - BIKANER ONE AHHA!
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Register Register  Login Login

CLASSIC CINDERELLA MYSTERIES - BIKANER ONE AHHA!

 Post Reply Post Reply Page  <123
Author
Message
Bas S Warwick View Drop Down
Recorded
Recorded
Avatar

Joined: 30 March 2010
Location: New Zealand
Status: Offline
Points: 210
Post Options Post Options   Quote Bas S Warwick Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 March 2013 at 09:24
No known errors here but I thought they might be of interest.

Not knowing what they were I bought them for their 'Cinderella' like appearance - but apparently the are quite legitimate 're-strikes' and valuable. 







The book The Stamps of Jammu & Kashmir tells of how the author, Frits Staal, and his collaborator, B.P. Sharma, found the old defaced Jammu & Kashmir implements in the museum in Srinagar, and printed off specimens of everything they found there in the purple ink of the scan. (The page reference is to the chapter in the book on reprints and forgeries. The actual story of the 'Five Fruitful Days in Srinagar' is at pages 229-266.)


Back to Top
ambrofos View Drop Down
First Class
First Class
Avatar

Joined: 31 March 2010
Status: Offline
Points: 61
Post Options Post Options   Quote ambrofos Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 March 2013 at 07:27
Do you know how these stamps were printed?  I wonder whether the plate was metal and whether the paper was pressed on top of the inked die and hand-rubbed? 

I am trying to figure out whether the stamps of Bikaner were printed from a wooden or perhaps a brass handstamp.  I have seen a wooden die which inspired this idea and the handstamps shown below are from Raj Bikaner   A theory against this is that in some instances the stamps of Bikaner are very heavily printed - almost embossed and this would require some considerable force without use of a press of some kind.







Yet, as the document below shows, there were plenty of large seals applied to documents, with sometimes indifferent results with respect to clarity of impression.






AMB
Back to Top
Bas S Warwick View Drop Down
Recorded
Recorded
Avatar

Joined: 30 March 2010
Location: New Zealand
Status: Offline
Points: 210
Post Options Post Options   Quote Bas S Warwick Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 March 2013 at 13:28
ambrofos - it seems the plates were metal and defaced so that they were of no further use. Not sure of the printing method but its probably in the book mentioned below. I appear to have some of the 'impressions' from the 'wounded implements'. As I understand from a specialist these are quite legitimate 're-strikes'. The book The Stamps of Jammu & Kashmir tells of how the author, Frits Staal, and his collaborator, B.P. Sharma, found the old defaced Jammu & Kashmir implements in the museum in Srinagar, and printed off specimens of everything they found there in the purple ink of the scan. (The page reference is to the chapter in the book on reprints and forgeries. The actual story of the 'Five Fruitful Days in Srinagar' is at pages 229-266.)

From http://www.kashmirstamps.ca/Overview.html
The wounded implements came to rest at the Sri Pratap Singh Museum in Srinagar. A few impressions of each in purple and black ink were made in August 1981 by Drs Frits Staal and B.P. Sharma in a wonderful summer adventure. The story is recounted in their essay, “Five Fruitful Days in Srinagar” in Staal’s text, The Stamps of Jammu and Kashmir (1983), a must for any J&K collector. A scan is of the ½a+1a Jammu Composite Plate is shown above. Five such reprints were produced from this implement. Reference: Staal pp 148-59
126
Back to Top
ambrofos View Drop Down
First Class
First Class
Avatar

Joined: 31 March 2010
Status: Offline
Points: 61
Post Options Post Options   Quote ambrofos Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 March 2013 at 20:45
Great web article  http://www.kashmirstamps.ca/Overview.html - thanks for letting me know.  
AMB
Back to Top
ambrofos View Drop Down
First Class
First Class
Avatar

Joined: 31 March 2010
Status: Offline
Points: 61
Post Options Post Options   Quote ambrofos Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 June 2013 at 08:41
I have been reorganizing and examining my collection and have come to the conclusion that there are at least 18 distinctly different die types of the one anna stamp.  I have also found two dies of the red two anna, and 2 inner value dies for the bi-colored eight anna stamp.  There are 2 dies at least of the red and green four anna stamp, and 2 distinctly different green frame dies for this as well.  There are 3 colors which vary from green, green-blue, to blue-green. 

Of the adhesive stamps there is one die for each major type.   In the case of the one anna, it too is found on stamp paper.  The authors of the catalog that I use, write that they had assumed that all dies exist as both adhesive revenue stamps and stamp papers, but I have not found this to be the case in my survey.  The revenue stamped papers show significantly greater diversity in design than the stamps.

Here is some other information I have received.

The black seal on 4 annas Talbana (court summons) stamp reads 'MEHKAME HISAB, RAJ SHRI BIKANER SA...) where the "SA..." means to introduce the Sambat year which, in this example, is not visible).   In english the inscription means 'ACCOUNTS OFFICE, BIKANER STATE'.
AMB
Back to Top
ambrofos View Drop Down
First Class
First Class
Avatar

Joined: 31 March 2010
Status: Offline
Points: 61
Post Options Post Options   Quote ambrofos Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 June 2013 at 07:06

Here is a better copy of the "EOUR" spelling of the 4 anna stamp paper.  The seal at the right of the stamp is a clear example of the "accounts office" seal I mentioned in the post above.
AMB
Back to Top
ambrofos View Drop Down
First Class
First Class
Avatar

Joined: 31 March 2010
Status: Offline
Points: 61
Post Options Post Options   Quote ambrofos Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 November 2013 at 23:14
Hi - I happened to find in Melville's Phantom Stamps: the following

with notes added by me in brackets []

Six stamps are included in the Catalog for Advanced Collectors as postage stamps of this Rajputana state and Moens included two of these, regarding the balance as fiscals.  This state has never had its own postage stamps.  Sir Charles Stewart Wilson [who founded of the Philatelic Society of India  in 1897] inquired into the status of these stamps and learnt through the British Resident at Bikaner that the two stamps illustrated [which are the quarter anna (black horizontal oblong) and half anna (red vertical oblong)] are

"Essays prepared some seventeen years ago [1880] for the then Maharaja Sirdar Singh, who intended to introduce a postal system.  This project however was never carried out, and the stamps were never issued at all."

The other stamps of Bikaner are all fiscals
AMB
Back to Top
ambrofos View Drop Down
First Class
First Class
Avatar

Joined: 31 March 2010
Status: Offline
Points: 61
Post Options Post Options   Quote ambrofos Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 March 2014 at 02:22
Here are a number of different die types - see if you can spot the differences in size and shapes of the top and bottom medallions and the differences in fonts, and positions of the circular ornaments at the right of the stamps


AMB
Back to Top
Steve View Drop Down
Mint
Mint
Avatar

Joined: 26 March 2010
Location: Wrexham
Status: Offline
Points: 3184
Post Options Post Options   Quote Steve Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 March 2014 at 05:35
Originally posted by ambrofos ambrofos wrote:

Here are a number of different die types - see if you can spot the differences in size and shapes of the top and bottom medallions and the differences in fonts, and positions of the circular ornaments at the right of the stamps


That is quite a range of die variations there. Some are perhaps easier to spot than others. I presume that you are attempting to catalogue or list these, and that would seem to be quite a task. Firstly actually desribing each in words would be difficult. So you are left in a situation where you call them types i, ii etc. To make this logical you not only have discover a chronology for these, and also make sure that you have no gaps.
Is a particular font always matched with a particular medallion type?
Back to Top
Colin View Drop Down
Mint
Mint
Avatar

Joined: 29 March 2010
Location: United Kingdom
Status: Offline
Points: 2096
Post Options Post Options   Quote Colin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 March 2014 at 06:25
Originally posted by Steve Steve wrote:

Is a particular font always matched with a particular medallion type?

I don't think it is a Font as such - all of the lettering - like the illustrative elements - looks individually hand-cut rather than mechanically produced.
Happiness doesn't come from getting something we don't have, but through recognising and appreciating what we do have.
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply Page  <123
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Forum Software by Web Wiz Forums® version 10.17
Copyright ©2001-2013 Web Wiz Ltd.